MAMMOTH – Innate

This is good for me. I should take a break from all the black, death, and doom metal which has currently been populating my queue. A refreshing in the progressive pool once in a while is good for the soul. At least that is what they said. I do not know who they is. Maybe shamans or Tool fans. Regardless of any of my preconceptions involving instrumental tech prog, one thing is certain: the level of technical knowledge and craftsmanship which is needed to make such a record does not come easily. To make a record that is not filled with self important solos and masturbatory interludes is quite difficult and one that a lot of bands still have yet to achieve. the fact that Mammoth can do without succumbing to their own egos while still piling on a mound full of noodles is quite impressive.

Let us get one thing out of the way before anything. This record comes with a strong thread of fun and upbeat attitudes. The opening track “Innate”: has a jammy funk breakdown which fills the sky with a melange of incense, jazz, and pot smoke. The point in which it dips back into the cosmic fold showcases the band’s ability to not only weave styles together but do it with panache. The band has retained the same lineup for two albums which seems to be strengthening the sound as they string together a series of EPs. I feel 30 minutes in the prog pool is just the right amount of time for people who already sunburnt from harsher styles of music.

This review is from someone who is ambivalent towards prog and fusion. This style of music tends to be polarizing to its listeners which makes Mammoth’s success all the more noticeable. In place of self indulgence and seriousness comes an EP which is similar to jumping in a pool with an open drink. The band is currently selling all 4 of their EPs for 20$ which is pretty good regardless of one’s taste for prog fusion. I could use these EPs as a lunch break. I heard they are good for the soul. At least that is what I have been told.

MAMMOTH
Album: Innate
Released: 19 May 2015
Label: Self Released
Website: Bandcamp
Score: 5/9 Hammers


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